Apr 7, 2010

EFECTO DE LA INMUNOGLOBULINA EN SPP


EFECTO DE LA INMUNOGLOBULINA INTRAVENOSA EN PACIENTES CON EL SÍNDROME DE POST-POLIO UN ESTUDIO EXPERIMENTAL INCONTROLADO

Autores: Jorge Kaponides a; Henrik González a; Tomas Olsson b; Kristian Borg a

unidad de b Neuroimmunology, centro para el hospital molecular de MedicineKarolinska, Estocolmo, Suecia
Afiliaciones:De los departamentos de ciencias de la salud pública, división de medicina de la rehabilitación, Estocolmo, Suecia

DOI: 10.1080/16501970500441625

Frecuencia de la publicación: 6 ediciones por año
Publicado en: El diario de la medicina de la rehabilitación, volumen 38, edición el 2 de marzo de 2006, pagina 138 - 140
Da formato a disponible: HTML (inglés): Pdf (inglés)
Publicado previamente como: Diario escandinavo de la medicina de la rehabilitación (0036-5505) hasta 2001

Extracto

Objetivo

Para analizar cambios en fuerza muscular, funcionamiento físico y calidad de vida durante el tratamiento intravenoso de la inmunoglobulina (IVIg) en pacientes con síndrome de la post-poliomielitis.
Diseño:
Abra el ensayo clínico.
Pacientes: Un total de 14 pacientes (6 mujeres, 8 hombres; la edad media 57 años, se extiende 43-67 años) fue incluida en el estudio.
Intervención: Tratamiento con 90 g IVIg(30 g diarios por 3 días).
Resultado principal: La fuerza muscular, medida con dynamometry dinámico, función del músculo, por medio de realizar una prueba minuciosa de la caminata 6, y la calidad de vida, analizada por medio del cuestionario SF-36, fue realizada antes y después del tratamiento.
Resultados: Para la calidad de vida había una mejora estadística significativa para todos una de las 8 escalas del multi-artículo de SF-36 al comparar datos antes y después del tratamiento con IVIg. El la mayoría de la escala del multi-artículo mejorado era vitalidad
No había aumento significativo en fuerza muscular y funcionamiento físico.

Conclusión: Los datos indican que IVIg puede tener un efecto clínico relevante, con una mejora en calidad de vida. El efecto puede ser debido a una disminución de un proceso inflamatorio en el sistema nervioso central, que se ha divulgado anterior en pacientes con síndrome de la más allá-poliomielitis después del tratamiento de IVIg. Puesto que un efecto posible del placebo no puede ser eliminado, un estudio controlado seleccionado al azar es necesario.































Hacer un Amigo es una Gracia
Tener un amigo es un Don
Conservar un Amigo es una Virtud
Ser un Amigo es un Honor

Loss of movement; Motor dysfunction




REFERENCE FROM 

A.D.A.M.

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Alternative Names
Paralysis; Paresis; Loss of movement; Motor dysfunction
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Considerations
Loss of muscle function may be caused by:
Injury such as a broken neck or back
Nerve damage (neuropathy)
Not using a muscle
Stroke or other brain injury
The loss of muscle function after these types of events can be severe, and often will not completely return.
Paralysis can be temporary or permanent. It can affect a small area (localized) or be widespread (generalized). It may affect one side (unilateral) or both sides (bilateral).
If the paralysis affects the lower half of the body and both legs it is called paraplegia. It if affects both arms and legs, it is called quadriplegia. If the paralysis affects the muscles that cause breathing, it is quickly life threatening.
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Causes
Causes of paralysis include:
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease)
Neuropathy
Paralytic shellfish poisoning
Periodic paralysis
Peroneal dystrophy
Stroke
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Home Care
Sudden loss of muscle function is a medical emergency. Seek immediate medical help.
After you have received medical treatment, your doctor may recommend some of the following measures:
Follow your prescribed therapy.
If the nerves to your face or head are damaged, you may have difficulty chewing and swallowing or closing your eyes. In these cases, a soft diet may be recommended. You will also need some form of eye protection, such as a patch over the eye while you are asleep.
Long-term immobility can cause serious complications. Change positions often and take care of your skin. Range-of-motion exercises may help to maintain some muscle tone.
Splints may help prevent muscle contractures, a condition in which a muscle becomes permanently shortened.

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When to Contact a Medical Professional
Muscle paralysis always requires immediate medical attention. If you notice gradual weakening or problems with a muscle, get medical attention as soon as possible.
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What to Expect at Your Office Visit
The doctor will perform a physical examination and ask questions about your medical history and symptoms, including:
Location
What part(s) of the body are affected?
Does it affect one or both sides of the body?
D it develop in a top-to-bottom pattern (descending paralysis), or a bottom-to-top pattern (ascending paralysis)?
Do you have difficulty getting out of a chair or climbing stairs?
Do you have difficulty lifting your arm above your head?
Do you have problems extending or lifting your wrist (wrist drop)?
Do you have difficulty gripping (grasping)?
Symptoms
Do you have pain?
Do you have numbnesstingling, or loss of sensation?
What other symptoms do you have?
Time pattern
Do episodes occur repeatedly (recurrent)?
How long do they last?
Is the muscle function loss getting worse (progressive)?
Is it progressing slowly or quickly?
Does it become worse over the course of the day?
Aggravating and relieving factors
What, if anything, makes the paralysis worse?
Does it get worse after you take potassium supplements by mouth?
Is it better after you rest?
Tests that may be performed include:
Blood studies (such as CBCblood differential, or blood chemistry levels)
Nerve conduction studies and electromyography
Intravenous feeding or feeding tubes may be required in severe cases. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, or speech therapy may be recommended.
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References
Griggs RC, Józefowicz RF, Aminoff MJ. Approach to the patient with neurologic disease. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa. Saunders Elsevier; 2007: chap 418.
Barohn RJ. Muscle diseases. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa. Saunders Elsevier; 2007: chap 447.



Hacer un Amigo es una Gracia
Tener un amigo es un Don
Conservar un Amigo es una Virtud
Ser un Amigo es un Honor

Apr 6, 2010

Polio Vaccine






Polio Vaccine

A polio vaccine is a medicine that is given to prevent polio. There are two general types. One type is the inactivated vaccine, which contains no live poliovirus. The other type is the oral vaccine, which contains live but weakened poliovirus. The vaccine was first licensed in 1955. Where and when it is given depends on whether the person is an adult or a child.

What Is a Polio Vaccine?

As you might expect, the polio vaccine is a medicine that is given to prevent polio(also called poliomyelitis).
 
(Click Polio Prevention for more information about preventing polio.)
 

Types of Polio Vaccine

There are two general types of polio vaccine. One type is an inactivated vaccine (the IPV), meaning that the vaccine contains no live poliovirus. The other type is an oral vaccine, which contains live but weakened poliovirus.
 
(Click Vaccine-Associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis for more information about the oral polio vaccine and its risks.)
 

History of Polio and the Polio Vaccine

A 1916 polio epidemic in the United States killed 6,000 people and paralyzed 27,000 more. In the early 1950s, there were more than 20,000 cases of polio each year. Vaccination began in 1955. By 1960, the number of polio disease cases had dropped to about 3,000. The last cases of paralytic poliomyelitis caused by endemic polio transmissionof wild virus in the United States were in 1979, when an outbreak occurred among the Amish in several Midwestern states. The success of the polio vaccine in the United States and other countries sparked a worldwide effort to eliminate polio.
 
The inactivated polio vaccine was licensed in 1955 and was used extensively from that time until the early 1960s. In 1961, the oral vaccine was licensed. This was the vaccine of choice in the United States and most other countries after its introduction. However, the oral vaccine can cause a rare but serious reaction called vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis. When an enhanced-potency inactivated polio vaccine became available in 1998, it was recommended that the oral vaccine no longer be used. In 2000, the use of the oral vaccine in the Unites States was discontinued.



Oral Polio Vaccine

The oral polio vaccine is quite effective in preventing the disease. However, because it poses a slight risk of a rare but serious condition, its use in the United States has been discontinued -- an enhanced-potency inactivated polio vaccine is now used instead. The oral vaccine is still used for polio prevention in many other parts of the world.

What Is the Oral Polio Vaccine?

Oral polio vaccine (OPV) contains live but weakened poliovirus. It is highly effective in polio prevention. However, because of the risk of a rare but serious condition called vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis, use of the oral polio vaccinein the United States was discontinued in 2000.
 

History of Polio and the Oral Vaccine

A 1916 polio epidemic in the United States killed 6,000 people and paralyzed 27,000 more. In the early 1950s, there were more than 20,000 cases of polio each year.
 
The first polio vaccine was licensed in 1955. This was an inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), meaning it did not contain any live poliovirus. By 1960, the number of cases had dropped to about 3,000. In 1961, an oral vaccine was licensed. Following its introduction, as the number of cases continued to drop. In 1979, the last cases of paralytic poliomyelitis caused by wild poliovirus in the United States occurred.
 
The success of polio vaccination in the United States and other countries sparked a worldwide effort to eliminate this disease.
 
In 1998, an enhanced-potency inactivated polio vaccine became available. Because oral polio vaccine can cause a rare but serious reaction called vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis, its use was not recommended. In 2000, the use of this vaccine in the Unites States was discontinued.
 

How Effective Is the Oral Polio Vaccine?

Oral polio vaccine is highly effective in producing immunity to poliovirus. A single dose produces immunity in approximately 50 percent of recipients. Three doses will produce immunity to all three poliovirus types in more than 95 percent of recipients. As with other live-virus vaccines, immunity from oral polio vaccine is probably lifelong.



Comparing Oral and Inactivated Polio Vaccines

There are two general polio vaccine types. One type is inactivated polio vaccine(IPV), meaning that the vaccine contains no live poliovirus. The other is live oral poliovaccine, which contains live but weakened poliovirus. Until recently, the oral vaccine was recommended for most children in the United States. It helped rid the United States of polio, and is still used in many parts of the world (largely because it is less expensive than the inactivated polio vaccine).
 
Both vaccines give immunity to polio, but the oral form is better at keeping the disease from spreading to other people. However, for a few people (about 1 in 2.4 million), oral polio vaccine actually causes polio (known as vaccine-associated paralytic polio).
 
Since the risk of getting polio in the United States is now extremely low, experts believe that using the oral vaccine is no longer worth the slight risk, except in limited circumstances, which your doctor can describe. The polio shot (inactivated polio vaccine) does not cause polio.
 
(Click Polio Vaccine to learn more about the inactivated vaccine.)
 

Vaccine-Associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis

Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis is a rare adverse reaction following live oral polio vaccine. It is caused by vaccine-derived poliovirus. One case occurred for every 2 to 3 million doses of oral vaccine administered. This resulted in 8 to 10 cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis each year in the United States.
 
From 1980 through 1999, vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis accounted for 95 percent of all cases of paralytic poliomyelitis reported in the United States.
 
(Click Vaccine-Associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis to learn more about this rare but serious reaction to the oral polio vaccine.)

















Hacer un Amigo es una Gracia
Tener un amigo es un Don
Conservar un Amigo es una Virtud
Ser un Amigo es un Honor

Apr 5, 2010

A race to erase polio

A race to erase polio text describing the image


Runners hit the streets during the Milton Rotary Club’s first 5k race, held two years ago in the Milton State Park. The third annual Milton Rotary 5K run/walk at the Milton State Park is slated for 9 a.m. Saturday, April 10. Registration is $15 before April 1. For more information, e-mail Chris Brady atcbrady@windstream.net. Standard Journal file photo.

Annual event is April 10 at Milton State Park

By Kevin Mertz
Published:
Saturday, March 27, 2010 3:11 AM CDT
MILTON — Runners and walkers, it’s almost time to lace up your sneakers for a good cause.

The third annual Milton Rotary 5K run/walk at the Milton State Park is slated to step off at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 10.

Runners and walkers will begin and end their events at the Milton State Park.

“It is dubbed the race to erase polio, because all the proceeds go to Rotary International’s goal of erasing polio from the planet,” said Chris Brady, event chair. “Polio is not at the forefront of diseases here in America, but it is a crippling disease that has, and continues to, afflict so many people.”


There are plenty of individuals who know people who have been affected by the disease, he said.

“Knowing that Rotary International is this close to wiping it out, every little bit helps,” Brady said.

He noted this is the first year that a walk will part of the event.

“We felt that, by adding a walk, it would allow a lot of people that wouldn’t otherwise participate to have the opportunity to take part in the event,” Brady said. “Plus it’s a great way to showcase the work that’s been done by the Friends of the Milton State Park.”

He said the walk will take place entirely within the park and will cover the trails Friends of the Milton State Park have been working hard to maintain.

“With the trails they created on the south portion of the island, you get a scenic view of the river and they’re really well maintained,” Brady continued. “If you’re lucky, you even get to see wildlife (while walking the trails).”


He said walkers may choose the distance they wish to cover. Distances begin at a half mile and go up from there. For the 5K race, which starts on the island, then continues into Milton before ending back on the island, Brady said support from the borough of Milton has been outstanding.

“We are deeply indebted to the borough, Chief (Craig) Lutcher and his police force in helping to ensure the runners’ safety on the roads,” Brady said. He noted the fire police also play a key role in protecting the participants during the event.

He also praised his fellow Rotarians who give their time to help make the event a success.

“A large portion of the club volunteers for this in one form or another,” Brady said.

He said the overall winning runners will receive a trophy.

“We have medals for (select) finishers,” he continued. “All pre-registered runners and walkers get a free T-shirt.”

A limited number of T-shirts will be available for runners registering on race day.

Registration is $15 before April 1, $20 on race day. Registration forms are available at the TIME office, Standard Journal or by e-mailing cbrady@windstream.net.

Staff writer Kevin Mertz can be reached at 570-742-9671 or e-mail kevin@standard-journal.com.



Hacer un Amigo es una Gracia
Tener un amigo es un Don
Conservar un Amigo es una Virtud
Ser un Amigo es un Honor




















Polio Film

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