Jun 27, 2018

11 Best Foods For Your Immune System

The following story is excerpted from TIME’s special edition, 100 Most Healing Foods, which is available in stores, at the Meredith Shop and at Amazon.
Vitamin C has a reputation for being a feel-good nutrient, so it will come as no surprise that this list is full of foods with high levels of it. In the body, vitamin C behaves as an antioxidant, which means it protects cells from free-radical damage. Consuming it also helps the body better absorb iron, which is critical for normal immune-system function.

Jalapeño peppers

Lucas Zarebinski
Why they’re good for you
Jalapeño peppers get their spice from a compound called capsaicin, which is something of an all-star in the nutrition world. Capsaicin acts as an anti-inflammatory agent and may ease arthritis symptoms. Some research suggests it can also keep your metabolism humming.
How to eat them
Add diced jalapeño peppers to guacamole for an extra kick of flavor. You can also mix these peppers into your favorite cornbread recipe.

Lemons

Lucas Zarebinski
Why they’re good for you
Lemons are high in compounds called bio-flavonoids, which kill cancer-causing free radicals. They also provide vitamin C (you can meet half your daily requirement from one fruit), so adding lemon juice to your meals is an easy strategy for protecting yourself against colds and other infections.
How to eat them
One simple way to work in a daily dose of vitamin C is to drink lemon water, either chilled or warm. A squeeze of lemon also makes steamed veggies tastier.

Apples

Lucas Zarebinski
Why they’re good for you
People who eat an apple a day use fewer prescription medications, according to a 2015 study. And regular apple eaters report fewer asthma symptoms, according to British research (a flavonoid called khellin may open up airways). Apples are also high in fiber, which can help reduce the inflammation common during infections. Bonus: they’re a superfood when it comes to satiety.
How to eat them
To turn apples into a more energizing snack, slice one up and enjoy with a spoonful of peanut or almond butter. Buy organic or wash well before eating: a recent study found that a little water and baking soda removes pesticide residue from the fruit.

Chicken soup

Lucas Zarebinski
Why it’s good for you
How to eat it
Simmer up your own soup and add nutrient-dense foods like carrots, onions and fresh herbs.

Garlic

Lucas Zarebinski
Why it’s good for you
How to eat it
For a flavor and immunity boost, add garlic to marinades, roasted vegetables or grain bowls.

Grapefruit

Lucas Zarebinski
Why it’s good for you
How to eat it
For a healthy morning treat, broil grapefruit with a little cinnamon sugar.

Ginger

Lucas Zarebinski
Why it’s good for you
How to eat it
Toss freshly ground ginger into a tofu stir-fry or sip it in your tea.

Sage

Lucas Zarebinski
Why it’s good for you
How to eat it
Mix sage, goat cheese and eggs for a flavor-filled omelet. You can also add this earthy herb to bean soups and chicken, pork and beef dishes.

Chamomile tea



Lucas Zarebinski
Why it’s good for you
an upset stomach. The flowers contain compounds called flavonoids that may help reduce inflammation and pain.
How to eat it
Make a healthy “hot toddy” with hot chamomile tea, honey and sliced lemon.

Fennel

Lucas Zarebinski
Why it’s good for you
How to eat it
You can roast fennel with other vegetables, or even boil, strain and drink it as a tea.

Cranberries

Lucas Zarebinski
Why they’re good for you
How to eat them
Cook cranberries and oranges or other citrus fruits on a stove top to make a jam.

Post Polio Litaff, Association A.C _APPLAC Mexico

How prepared is the world for the next epidemic? This tool shows most countries are not.



PreventEpidemics.org is the first website that gives a score to each country based on their ability to find, stop and prevent epidemics. (PreventEpidemics.org)
Public health officials and business leaders like Bill Gates have long warned that the world is not ready for the next pandemic.
Now an initiative led by Tom Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has developed a tool that spotlights gaps in preparedness, and actions that countries and organizations can take to close them. The new website, PreventEpidemics.org, gives an individual score to each country and uses color codes to rank the world by five levels of preparedness.
“What this does, it tells you where the gaps are and what needs to be done,” said Frieden, chief executive of Resolve to Save Lives, part of Vital Strategies, a New York-based public health nonprofit organization.
Infectious diseases can spread from one village to any country in the world in about 36 hours. On average, there are 100 outbreaks a day around the world. But the website shows that most countries have not yet taken the steps needed to prepare for this risk.
The score, from 0 to 100, is based on existing data from evaluations of epidemic preparedness developed by the World Health Organization after the 2014 Ebola epidemic. Those evaluations have been going on since 2016, but the data contained in them, while public, is difficult to find.
Independent and regular monitoring and tracking for epidemic and pandemic risk is key to keeping biological threats on the agenda of global political leaders, experts say.
Tom Inglesby, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, said the tool “shines a more clear light” on the results of those evaluations in a way that can “help sustain the attention of political leaders and donors.” The identified gaps will be easy for donors to understand and to address, he said.
Only 430 million people, or 6 percent of the world’s population, live in the countries that are considered better prepared to prevent epidemics, according to their scores. (They include AustraliaBelgiumFinland,Oman, South Korea, Sloveniathe United Arab Emirates and the United States.) While those countries, highlighted in green, have scores above 80, not a single country has completed all the steps that are recommended, including making a plan to address gaps in funding and implementing the plan.
But more than 60 percent of countries, representing nearly 5 billion people, have not volunteered to conduct these epidemic preparedness evaluations, including most of Europe, Russia, China, India and virtually all of South America.
By the end of the year, 100 countries will have gone through this rigorous evaluation, which Frieden said is a real accomplishment and indicates the commitment of countries to improve.
“Progress assessing those gaps has been excellent,” he said. “Progress fixing them, not so good.”
The website is being presented Friday at the annual Aspen Ideas Spotlight Health Festival.

Nigeria, which has been battling outbreaks of yellow fever, monkey pox and Lassa virus, which can cause a lethal hemorrhagic fever resembling Ebola, is one of the countries identified by PreventEpidemics as not ready. Frieden’s group is helping Nigeria improve its disease surveillance by providing laptops and staff to the health ministry so its detection team gets better data.  FROM

Post Polio Litaff, Association A.C _APPLAC Mexico

Polio Film

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/polio/

Entradas populares

Twitter

Links

México Post Polio Una Vida Un Camino Una Experiencia
http://postpoliosinmex.blogspot.com/

Post Polio LITAFF A.C.

www.postpoliolitaff.org/
Postpoliolitaff.- Asociación Post Polio Litaff A.C Primera Organización oficial sobre Síndrome de Post Poliomielitis En México.


Polio y Efectos Secundarios SPP
http://polioyspp.blogspot.com/
- See more at: http://polioamigossinfronteras.blogspot.mx/#sthash.6PkHAkfM.dpuf

APPLAC

Salk Institute

Polio Video

Polio Lungs

https://youtu.be/qytuMHXDlds

Polio Reinders

March Of Dimes Polio History

Erradicación de La poliomielitis

Blog Archive

Search This Blog

No more Polio

Dr. Bruno