Physiotherapy, braces, special shoes, calipers, and in many cases,


Nigeria: The Fresh Offensive Against Polio Ruby Rabiu
Children who suffer a permanent paralysis of the limbs due to Polio require an extensive program of rehabilitation. This may include physiotherapy, braces, special shoes, calipers, and in many cases, orthopaedic surgery. A team effort from doctors, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and psychologists is required to get each child through the ordeal. 
    

An ongoing healthy standard of living is very important to our children.
 A well-balanced diet, a thorough exercise regime, and appropriate healthcare can help manage the ongoing impact of Polio, as well as help in later life should the child be amongst the 25% of sufferers that will develop Post Polio Syndrome (PPS).PPS symptoms include fatigue, slow-progressive muscle weakness, muscle and joint pain, and muscular atrophy. PPS can strike polio survivors anywhere from 10 to 40 years after their recovery from polio. 

Fortunately, there is no effect of the Polio virus on the brain, so these children remain completely able to take part in a normal school curriculum and achieve highly in life. 
T
he SKSN Limb Workshop fits children with the appliances they require, whether it be braces or calipers, and the school provides funding to enable the children to visit specialist prosthetic units, should an artificial limb be required. 
8 March 2010
Beginning from Saturday, March 6, Nigeria joined 19 countries in West and Central Africa in a campaign to immunize over 85 million children under five years old against polio. The four-day exercise ends today.
Nigeria's effort has been supported by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), World Health Organisation (WHO), and other international partners.
A schedule of the programme from the UNICEF office in Nigeria shows that staff at 19,112 fixed immunization posts will immunize babies and children while 32,172 house-to-house vaccination teams and 14,224 special teams carrying vaccine cool are travelling on foot or motorbikes and in cars and boats on the door-to-door vaccination drive.
The other countries involved in this special programme include Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal and Sierra Leone. All these countries are in the March 6 to 9 immunization programme.
Cote d' Ivoire, Niger and Togo will join at a later date because of transition programmes currently taking place in the three countries.
The campaign is being spearheaded by the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, a network of partners including national governments, the Rotary International, the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, the International Federation of the Red Cross, as well as the UNICEF and WHO.
The aim is to reach every child under the age of five. It is considered significant because without a critical mass of children being immunized, the virus will rage on. More than 400,000 volunteers and health workers are involved in the aim to reach the targeted 85 million children.

Part of a statement from UNICEF which relates the incidence of polio in the two subcontinents, reads, "For children in West and Central Africa, the threat of the crippling disease, eradicated in much of the world, still looms. In Nigeria, the virulent polio virus is still endemic. In 2008, it spread from the north of the country to other nations in the region. Many of these countries were on the way to being declared polio-free and had successfully eradicated the virus. Yet with the movement of people across borders, and the inadequate level of routine immunization in many areas, the virus has quickly spread. Now, many of these areas are re-infected, threatening more children with paralysis and even death."
In the current logistical exercise, vaccination teams are crossing some of the toughest and most challenging terrain in Africa to reach children. The teams, equipped with special carriers that ensure the vaccine remains below the required 8 degrees Celsius, go from door to door in search of every child under five.
Experienced health workers are being deployed to locations known to be the most challenging. A special plan is in place to focus on the border areas between countries with an independent monitoring system developed to track progress. Count Down, an internet newsletter produced every two weeks by the World Health Organization in Nigeria, provides an update on the effect of polio in Nigeria within the last one year. According to the update which comes under the caption, "Total number of children paralysed by polio 26 February 2009 to 26 February 2010," Kano State presents the worst case of 70.
Kano is followed by other affected states in this order: Katsina (25), Bauchi (23), Borno (16), Kebbi (14), and Niger (13). Zamfara, Sokoto, and Kaduna states had 10 cases each, while Gombe and Yobe had nine and eight cases respectively. The states of Delta, Kogi, and Nasarawa suffered five polio paralysis each within the recorded year while Benue, Plateau and Bayelsa came down each with four. Three and two cases were recorded against Ogun and Ebonyi States respectively while Abia, Lagos, Edo and Kwara states had one each.

International Organisations
The Count Down newsletter, known fully as Count Down to Polio Eradication in Nigeria, also reports, however, that a more portent vaccine, the bivalent Oral Polio Vaccine (bOPV)), which was administered for the first time in Africa in Nigeria during the January National Immunization Plus Days (IPDs) would speed up the interruption of the polio viruses troubling Nigeria and neighbouring countries.
It explains in its report that the bOPV "simultaneously targets type 1 and 3 polio viruses and is at least 30 percent more effective than the traditional trivalent polio vaccine, according to a clinical field trial conducted in India."
The success of the polio eradication exercise will be significant. It will mean the prevention of a life of disability and physical hardship in communities already facing countless threats to survival.
Nigeria:The Nation Records 90 Percent Reduction in Polio:Cases
Akor Sylvester
16 March 2010
           

Abuja — Efforts to meet the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in the country last weekend received a boost, as the Minister of Health, Prof. Babatunde Osotimehin said that Nigeria has recorded about 90 per cent reduction in wide polio virus infection in the past one year.
He said this last Saturday Polio" campaign organized by the National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA) in Abuja.
"That is why we are staging this 'Walk Against Polio' campaign, to involve all Nigerian in the fight against polio. This is the time to double our efforts. This is also the time expected of our friends all over the world to support us in the struggle," he said.
He said that the success so far recorded could not have been possible without the support of the development partners, traditional and religious leaders, as well as the political commitment of the present administration.
Flagging off the campaign at the Old Parade ground Abuja, Minister for the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Senator Adamu Alairo, said the FCT administration, having understood that polio could be transmitted by poor environment through contaminated food and water, laid more emphasis on clean and healthy environment.
"The polio walk is a social mobilisation strategy that seeks to create and heighten awareness about polio, and enhance community acceptance and ownership of polio eradication activities and other health services. This is expected to ensure improved quality and effectiveness in primary health care programme. This will also serve and sustain political commitment at all levels," he said.
He said the government was not only optimistic that it could totally eradicate polio, but also reduced the prevalence of other child killer disease, such as measles, diphtheria and yellow fever. He added that the involvement of traditional and religious leaders was making positive "in-road in the fight against polio."
While calling on relevant stakeholders to assist government in its resolve to free the country from polio diseases, the minister said his would continue to collaborate with the health ministry in ensuring that the country wins the battle against polio infection. 
 Nigeria: The Fresh Offensive Against Polio
Ruby Rabiu
8 March 2010
Beginning from Saturday March 6, Nigeria joined 19 countries in West and Central Africa in a campaign to immunize over 85 million children under five years old against polio. The four-day exercise ends today.
Nigeria's effort has been supported by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), World Health Organisation (WHO), and other international partners.
A schedule of the programme from the UNICEF office in Nigeria shows that staff at 19,112 fixed immunization posts will immunize babies and children while 32,172 house-to-house vaccination teams and 14,224 special teams carrying vaccine cool are travelling on foot or motorbikes and in cars and boats on the door-to-door vaccination drive.
The other countries involved in this special programme include Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal and Sierra Leone. All these countries are in the March 6 to 9 immunization programme.
Cote d' Ivoire, Niger and Togo will join at a later date because of transition programmes currently taking place in the three countries.
The campaign is being spearheaded by the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, a network of partners including national governments, the Rotary International, the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, the International Federation of the Red Cross, as well as the UNICEF and WHO.
The aim is to reach every child under the age of five. It is considered significant because without a critical mass of children being immunized, the virus will rage on. More than 400,000 volunteers and health workers are involved in the aim to reach the targeted 85 million children.
Part of a statement from UNICEF which relates the incidence of polio in the two subcontinents, reads, "For children in West and Central Africa, the threat of the crippling disease, eradicated in much of the world, still looms. In Nigeria, the virulent polio virus is still endemic. In 2008, it spread from the north of the country to other nations in the region. Many of these countries were on the way to being declared polio-free and had successfully eradicated the virus. Yet with the movement of people across borders, and the inadequate level of routine immunization in many areas, the virus has quickly spread. Now, many of these areas are re-infected, threatening more children with paralysis and even death."
In the current logistical exercise, vaccination teams are crossing some of the toughest and most challenging terrain in Africa to reach children. The teams, equipped with special carriers that ensure the vaccine remains below the required 8 degrees Celsius, go from door to door in search of every child under five.
Experienced health workers are being deployed to locations known to be the most challenging. A special plan is in place to focus on the border areas between countries with an independent monitoring system developed to track progress. Count Down, an internet newsletter produced every two weeks by the World Health Organization in Nigeria, provides an update on the effect of polio in Nigeria within the last one year. According to the update which comes under the caption, "Total number of children paralysed by polio 26 February 2009 to 26 February 2010," Kano State presents the worst case of 70.
Kano is followed by other affected states in this order: Katsina (25), Bauchi (23), Borno (16), Kebbi (14), and Niger (13). Zamfara, Sokoto, and Kaduna states had 10 cases each, while Gombe and Yobe had nine and eight cases respectively. The states of Delta, Kogi, and Nasarawa suffered five polio paralysis each within the recorded year while Benue, Plateau and Bayelsa came down each with four. Three and two cases were recorded against Ogun and Ebonyi States respectively while Abia, Lagos, Edo and Kwara states had one each.
The Count Down newsletter, known fully as Count Down to Polio Eradication in Nigeria, also reports, however, that a more portent vaccine, the bivalent Oral Polio Vaccine (bOPV)), which was administered for the first time in Africa in Nigeria during the January National Immunization Plus Days (IPDs) would speed up the interruption of the polio viruses troubling Nigeria and neighbouring countries.
It explains in its report that the bOPV "simultaneously targets type 1 and 3 polio viruses and is at least 30 percent more effective than the traditional trivalent polio vaccine, according to a clinical field trial conducted in India."
The success of the polio eradication exercise will be significant. It will mean the prevention of a life of disability and physical hardship in communities already facing countless threats to survival
Nigeria: The Nation Records 90 Percent Reduction in Polio Cases
Akor Sylvester
16 March 2010
           Abuja — Efforts to meet the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in the country last weekend received a boost, as the Minister of Health, Prof. Babatunde Osotimehin said that Nigeria has recorded about 90 per cent reduction in wide polio virus infection in the past one year.
He said this last Saturday Polio" campaign organized by the National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA) in Abuja.
"That is why we are staging this 'Walk Against Polio' campaign, to involve all Nigerian in the fight against polio. This is the time to double our efforts. This is also the time expected of our friends all over the world to support us in the struggle," he said.
He said that the success so far recorded could not have been possible without the support of the development partners, traditional and religious leaders, as well as the political commitment of the present administration.
Flagging off the campaign at the Old Parade ground Abuja, Minister for the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Senator Adamu Alairo, said the FCT administration, having understood that polio could be transmitted by poor environment through contaminated food and water, laid more emphasis on clean and healthy environment.
"The polio walk is a social mobilisation strategy that seeks to create and heighten awareness about polio, and enhance community acceptance and ownership of polio eradication activities and other health services. This is expected to ensure improved quality and effectiveness in primary health care programme. This will also serve and sustain political commitment at all levels," he said.
He said the government was not only optimistic that it could totally eradicate polio, but also reduced the prevalence of other child killer disease, such as measles, diphtheria and yellow fever. He added that the involvement of traditional and religious leaders was making positive "in-road in the fight against polio."
While calling on relevant stakeholders to assist government in its resolve to free the country from polio diseases, the minister said his would continue to collaborate with the health ministry in ensuring that the country wins the battle against polio infection.


The Polio Crusade

THE POLIO CRUSADE IN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE A GOOD VIDEO THE STORY OF THE POLIO CRUSADE pays tribute to a time when Americans banded together to conquer a terrible disease. The medical breakthrough saved countless lives and had a pervasive impact on American philanthropy that ... Continue reading..http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/polio/

Erradicación de La poliomielitis

Polio Tricisilla Adaptada